Singles

Sevi Freeman of Eugene dances and twirls with Marley Arient, 1 1/2, of Glide at the Music on the Half Shell at Stewart Park Tuesday. Marley’s mother, Chelsea Arient, keeps a watchful arm beneath her.

Olivia Mackenzie, 13, of New London passes through the finish-line banners at the end of the family ride at the Rail Trail Run and Ride in Andover on Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014. The inagural race highlighted the Northern Rail Trail and featured several 5K races, a 50-kilometer bike race and a family bike ride. The race, associated with the Law Enforcement Torch Run, raised money for the Special Olympics of New Hampshire.

Olivia Mackenzie, 13, of New London passes through the finish-line banners at the end of the family ride at the Rail Trail Run and Ride in Andover. The inagural race highlighted the Northern Rail Trail and featured several 5K races, a 50-kilometer bike race and a family bike ride. The race, associated with the Law Enforcement Torch Run, raised money for the Special Olympics of New Hampshire.

Kira Stuckey, left, and Taylor Ruley watch from the sidelines as an older group of girls performs at Saturday’s ‘Extravadance’ recital at Jacoby Auditorium.

Jim Barrett and John Horwath, both veterans in the Vietnam motorcycle group In Country, stand outside Barrett’s Sutherlin home, where he proudly flies his American flag year-round.

Teresa Miller, 51, holds a picture of the military men in her family: son Christopher Miller in the Air Force, husband David Miller, who is retired from the Army, and son Drexel Miller, who also joined the Army. The stars and stripes decorate the Miller home in many forms, including this plaque on the outside wall and a traditional flag on a tall pole out front.

Ashley Adams, 18, pauses for a moment before going back to work for the first time after giving birth to her now 6-week-old daughter, Kalie. “This is probably the hardest thing I’ve had to do,” Adams said. Adams leaves her husband, Brandon, home alone for the first time with both daughters Kalie and Julie, 2, to return to her job as senior beauty advisor at Walgreens in Hermitage, Tenn.

Hannah Garland, 4, and Deborah Garland, 8, brush their teeth as they get ready to go to bed. The Garland family lives in an old farmhouse in Vevay, Ind., that has been in the family for over 60 years.

Ronny Ventura, 16, from the Dominican Republic dances with a group of kids after his dance group performed at the Concord Multicultural Festival on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2014. Ventura and his group, Asociacion Carnivalesca de Massachusetts, donned "diablo cojuelos" - or limping devils - costumes for a dance called "Ali Baba."

Ronny Ventura, 16, from the Dominican Republic dances with a group of kids after his dance group performed at the Concord Multicultural Festival. Ventura and his group, Asociacion Carnivalesca de Massachusetts, donned “diablo cojuelos” – or limping devils – costumes for a dance called “Ali Baba.”

Mazambi Binita of the Congo talks with a group of friends at the Concord Multicultural Festival on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2014. Binita, who was in a refugee camp in Tanzania for 14 years before moving to the United States two years ago, made traditional Congalese food for the festival that included rice and beans, cabbage, beef, chicken and casava.

Mazambi Binita of the Congo talks with a group of friends at the Concord Multicultural Festival. Binita, who was in a refugee camp in Tanzania for 14 years before moving to the United States two years ago, made traditional Congalese food for the festival that included rice and beans, cabbage, beef, chicken and casava.

Children visiting the Canterbury Village Artisan Festival in Canterbury, N.H., examine the letterpress pieces in the print shop at the village before a volunteer prints their names.

The close-knit volunteer firefighter community of Madison, Ind., was rocked when Greg Cloud, a firefighter from the Kent district, died in a blaze at the Little King Horse Farm. Hanover firefighters console each other after failing to rescue him from the five-alarm fire. It was the first loss in the line of duty the county had ever experienced.

Robin West, left, responds with exasperation at the news that they might have to help bail Joe’s brother out of some financial trouble. While they have been having financial struggles themselves with Joe’s medical needs, in the past couple of weeks they have been having to loan money to his brother in Arkansas as he tries to get back on his feet. Now, he has ended up in a state he’s not supposed to be in with his car impounded, and he needs money to get it out.

A visitor peers through the greenhouse doors at the annual poinsettia trials at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, N.H.

Allison Adams, 8, watches on as her three siblings play in the yard of their Lawrenceburg, Ky., home.

Sophia Harne, 13, of Warner waves as she spots a group of her friends while riding the Tornado ride in the Midway with her friend Cierra Mailloux, 14, of Hopkinton at the Warner Fall Foliage Festival on Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014. (JULIE BYRD-JENKINS / Monitor staff)

Sophia Harne, 13, of Warner waves as she spots a group of her friends while riding the Tornado ride in the Midway with her friend Cierra Mailloux, 14, of Hopkinton at the Warner Fall Foliage Festival.

When she became pregnant, Ana dropped out of high school to take care of her daughter, though she receives lots of support from hers and Graham’s families. “Surprisingly my dad didn’t get mad,” she said. “The only person that told me I had ruined my life was my aunt.”

Amanda Hutchings, from left, Dirk Kats, Blake Ballew and Brooke Yarbrough look out from the edge as Barry Hutchings points out details of the trip Ballew and Yarbrough’s pickup took down a mountainside. Hutchings, battalion chief of Douglas County Fire District #2, was among the responders to the scene of the accident in February.

While reading a storybook about the ocean, Vickie Beach snuggles with her student, Hadden, thanking him for his smart answers to her questions about animals that live in the ocean. Beach teaches at Big Red School at the Clinical Education Complex, affiliated with Western Kentucky University. Half of the preschoolers in her class are normal children, while the other half have learning disabilities from Down Syndrome to autism. “I truly love what I do. Every day is a joy,” she said.

Children from the local Head Start group participate in the annual Veteran’s Day parade in Bowilng Green, Ky.

Sharon Byrd sits quietly in her assisted living apartment at Pennington Bend Assisted Living in Hendersonville, Tenn. She was one of those rare cases that developed Alzheimer’s at an early age, only 62 when she received the diagnosis. “We knew there was something wrong when she was demoted from a manager to a greeter at Wal-Mart,” said her daughter, Desiree Jenkins.

The day after the historic flooding in Nashville, Tenn., students of the Frederick Douglass Head Start in east Nashville come to see the water that had overtaken their school. The building, only two years old, succumbed to the floodwaters of the Cumberland River and will not be usable for the rest of the year.

Andrew Garland, 5, goes into the chicken house on his family’s farm in Vevay, Ind., to check on his baby chicks that he raises. Andrew lives on the farm with his adoptive parents Roger and Lisa, and five siblings.

A weimaraner faithfully waits in the front lawn for his master to arrive home in Inglewood, Tenn.

Deborah Garland of Vevay, Ind., writes a special message for her mom on the driveway.

Barry Harmon wears two unique hats – that of the Boyle County, Ky., jailer and as the pastor of New Harmony Baptist Church. He splits his time between shepherding the congregation at his church and helping the lost in the Boyle County jail.

A girl waits for her mother and grandmother as they pay for pastries at El Mercadito Hispano in the “Little Mexico” district of Bowling Green, Ky. Right across the tracks from Western Kentucky University, an entire hispanic culture is alive with a church, several restuarants and convenience shops, and plenty of families from Guatemala, Honduras, and several other countries of Latin America.

Four-year-old Gabe Williamson of Elkton greets a monarch butterfly hiding under the plants in the enclosure at the Elkton Community Education Center during the Blooms and Butterflies celebration Saturday.

Clint Blalock, 14, carefully records the number of pitches on each team during a match between his team, the Lebanon Blue Devils, and the visiting team from Rossview. Blalock and his two older brothers, Chase and Kyle, are all on the Lebanon baseball team. Clint was born with a mental disability, but has always followed in his brothers’ footsteps and loves baseball. “You’d think he was a ball player his whole life; he’s always wearing baseball stuff,” said their father Eddy Blalock.

The Bowman family, participating as members of the Patriot Guard Riders, line the drive to the memorial service of United States Air Force Tech Sgt. Donald Hoskins. Hoskins, a native of Madison, Ind., was missing in action in the Vietnam War in 1972, and his remains were positively identified over 35 years later.

After a tornado ravaged most of their town, volunteers in the Newburgh, Ind. community stepped up to help their neighbors patch together their homes. They picked precious belongings from yards, cleared debris from cul-de-sacs and covered gaping holes in homes with plastic tarps.

Keith Carr, 80, pauses in July to talk about the buildings at Fort Umpqua in Elkton. Carr, a volunteer with the Elkton Community Education Center, has been helping with the design and construction of the replica fort since the project began in 2005.